Joy Cardona

on Thursday, 03 May 2012. Posted in Gillard Election 2010 Campaign

Joy Cardona

Elna Joy Cardona known as Joy is of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent. Her families are from the Malak Malak of Daly River and the Iwadjia of West Arnhem Land. Joy is a Traditional Owner of the Malak Malak.

Joy is currently employed with the Northern Territory Library, as the Aboriginal Heritage Co-ordinator for Public Libraries and Knowledge Centres. In this position she is assisting the NT Library in developing culturally appropriate Indigenous Library and Information Services for Darwin and the remote communities. Joy is one of four NT NATSIWG National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Gathering Delegate, she is also on the (ATSIDA) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Data Archive Reference Group for UTS, and Secretary for ATSLIRN Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Library Information Research Network.

Joy grew up in Darwin and went to school the Catholic School St Mary’s, and left at Year 10. Joy also played a lot of sports during her teenage years, Basketball, Hockey, Cycling, Softball and Aussie Rules.

Joy first joined the work force in 1972 in the Department of Health Typing pool. from there she was assigned to various jobs as then the Public Services where then just beginning to put together employment of Aboriginal people for their status, so she worked various hours with Department of Health, assisting the Matron at RDH and then on the odd days at the Department of Housing and Construction Registry.

Cyclone Tracy hit Darwin and all things changed, with her eldest daughter Joy being evaluated to Perth where she continues to work in a Department until Darwin was safe to return.

On her return Joy joined the NT Police Department as the Aboriginal Liaison Officer, and worked in Communication and the Front Desk. Around this time Joy was into finding her own identity because of all the different descendents she was related to. So she applied for a job at the new Northern Land Council (NLC). During this time she worked with the Full Council at the time when Land Rights was developing into a political issue, under the Galarrwuy Yununingu. Joy then went back into the NTPS and was elected to the Northern Land Council Executive as the Member for Darwin.

By this stage Joy was divorced and rasing three children, she then worked for the Federal Government of DEET, delivering programs to remote Communities in the Top End of the Northern Territory.

From there Joy furthered her Education by obtaining a Degree in Applied Science in Aboriginal Community Management and Development from Curtin University, WA in 1997.

A lot of other dramas happened whilst bringing up three children, but Joy kept going and saw that part as a learning and education part of her life.

Joy has worked in many areas such as Health, Education, Housing, NT Police, and Aboriginal Community Police Scheme.

She continues her sporting career in becoming the first female to umpire a Australian Rules Game. She became the longest reining Goal Umpire for the Northern Territory doing 152 League games, 3 Grand Finals and 2 Rep Games.

Now she is still into sport as the Team Manager for the New football team in the AFLNT the Tiwi Bombers which keeps her pretty busy on weekends during the Wet Season.

Commentaries by Joy Cardona:

18 August 2010

Employment, Education and Training

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are always employed at the low end of the scale, however the opportunity have been put in place to enable people to improve their stance with the training packages that are available and if they can focus on extra studies to enhance their chances of securing a better position by taking up a course at Institutional establishment to ensure stability in their jobs.

To enhance opportunities for promotion and participation in career development, to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander member’s awareness of internal and external training programs and initiatives, and to have all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander fully trained in effective cross cultural communication and cross cultural trainers to present to new staff to Government Departments and Agencies in more equitable and satisfying career paths for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, to improve recruitment and employment procedures and practices that would attract and I believe from the Top to the Bottom of Government Departments and their Agencies that to achieve the Aims and Objectives of any Employment Strategy the need for the following to be implemented which are:

Attraction

Recruitment

Development and Retention

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people need appropriate training opportunities, long term employment, and they need to have sufficient resources, fairer remuneration which will lead to improved lifestyle and for a substantial future.

To overcome the barriers to attract more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into the organisation who would otherwise be precluded by virtue of standard recruitment and training procedures the aim obviously and strategy development needs a long term effect on the Government Service, it is important that as many of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employee’s within the existing structures as possible are consulted and have the opportunity to effect the potential outcome of the Strategy.

Aboriginal people in the Remote/Urban Communities in the Northern Territory are unaware of the advantages that Government Federal/State/Local, could offer with employment, or what the advantages where available as a career path, and are still within the mist today that Numerous and Literacy levels still causes the disadvantages of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, as the barrier are for Year 12 qualifications and not many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander reach the Educational level.

Consultation with Remote Aboriginal Communities in the Northern Territory, should be conducted for their views and support in the process of this development to ensure that both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander would feel comfortable in apply for vacant position or take up training to win positions within Cities, Rural or Remote Australia.

Leadership Camp to develop and encourage young school leavers and young adults to look at their future an important role in the Government achieving its Closing the Gap objectives through positioning awareness within Libraries, Knowledge Centre as important places for expression, reading and access to information; enhancing social cohesion and economic development; and contributing to knowledge growth and literacy, extra funding for Libraries and Local Knowledge Centres to promote and maintains cultural understanding and respect of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture.

A Cross Cultural Awareness Program within all Work forces throughout Australia to develop the understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture, which would be come an important tool for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and the Employee.

The Package should have in it the Aboriginal Terms of Reference and its framework which includes the Aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in regards to the policies of Self Management and Self Determination, it outlines the Social Change and goals and individual choices for the future, this presentation outlines the Cultural Elements of knowledge, Obligations, Kinship System, Aboriginal History, Spirituality/religion Values, Beliefs, Family Structures, Heritage Lore/Law, Language’s Ceremonies.

It should also provide the clients or Stakeholders with the question of What is Culture, Culture is a way of life it identifies a group of people who determines actions and takes in rules and laws, it takes in a set of learned attitudes and values, rules and laws, language, structures, ceremonies, kinship and Spiritual beliefs.

There are two very important aspects of which to develop an Aboriginal Employment and Career Development Strategy across all employment sectors, and an Aboriginal Cross Culture Package, will enable everyone to understand the barriers faced by many Aboriginal people seeking employment. There are limitations on career opportunities within Remote Aboriginal Communities in the Northern Territory, and no development schemes within the existing schemes which reduce the chances of attracting many Aboriginal people who have the potential to enter the Work Force.

In closing on my last commentary I would like to thank Dr Diann Rodgers-Healey for taking the chance in giving me this opportunity in having a say, I appreciate it and I hope that I have contribute to this course and that the future Government Leaders have a chance through their advisers to adhere to our call, that we as Women not only Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander but every Women in Australia gets a fair deal and we are paid at the right level and that all the struggles and words from the other Panel Members are heard.

For know I say in the Malak Malak Language Mummuk which means Good Bye.



18 July 2010

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in Leadership Roles

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women play an important part in the development of the future in Australia.

The aim is to ensure the security of our children and grandchildren in obtaining a good Education, Training and Employment; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women show Leadership in their everyday lives in keeping their families safe from harm, they teach their children the skills in both streams of Western and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Cultures.

There is a need in Australia for the increase in Leadership skills and abilities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women, in having input into decision making roles, especially in community decision-making.

A demand in access to information on Leadership roles/responsibilities and assistants in preparing more leaders from the young youth and young adults, and making Government Minister’s aware and to understand these grave concerns to ensure that the future is protected.

Acknowledgement for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women to celebrate the achievements of Women in variety of leadership roles, and showcase the diverse leadership styles that exits of the skills of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women, a Hall of Fame and a database of names to be placed in all States and Territory.

Funding to be provided for an appropriate transfer of knowledge, and implemented out in the Remote and Rural Communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women need more Education on ‘What are Human Rights” and support is needed to respond to stand up when Aboriginal people are being mistreated, and increase awareness.

There is a need for Federal/State/Local Governments to understand the ‘real’ situation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Remote and Urban communities and understand the frustrating when nothing is progressing.

One of the priority issues which need attention is the lack of Outcomes, in Community engagement, self-determination (autonomy), lack of cultural appropriate services (non-Aboriginal services delivering to Aboriginal people). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women ask that Government Agencies to implement a coordination approach for Aboriginal specific funding, Government need to listen and empower communities for change to happen, successful achievements to be promoted i.e. need more positive stories told not always negative ones, and to develop a model that expands/replicates to other initiatives that will encourage success for outcomes to other programs, and not reinvent the wheel.

Reward Success, promote National and local leadership programs (men’s youth and Women), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women recommend strongly to implement existing recommendations from successful reports e.g. Royal Commission Report into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, Little Children are Sacred, Bringing them Home to improve promotion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in Leadership in Urban, Remote, Regional, Mainstream Australia.



4 July 2010

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in Leadership Roles

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women play an important part in the development of the future in Australia.

The aim is to ensure the security of our children and grandchildren in obtaining a good Education, Training and Employment; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women show Leadership in their everyday lives in keeping their families safe from harm, they teach their children the skills in both streams of Western and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Cultures.

There is a need in Australia for the increase in Leadership skills and abilities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women, in having input into decision making roles, especially in community decision-making.

A demand in access to information on Leadership roles/responsibilities and assistants in preparing more leaders from the young youth and young adults, and making Government Minister’s aware and to understand these grave concerns to ensure that the future is protected.

Acknowledgement for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women to celebrate the achievements of Women in variety of leadership roles, and showcase the diverse leadership styles that exits of the skills of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women, a Hall of Fame and a database of names to be placed in all States and Territory.

Funding to be provided for an appropriate transfer of knowledge, and implemented out in the Remote and Rural Communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women need more Education on ‘What are Human Rights” and support is needed to respond to stand up when Aboriginal people are being mistreated, and increase awareness.

There is a need for Federal/State/Local Governments to understand the ‘real’ situation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in Remote and Urban communities and understand the frustrating when nothing is progressing.

One of the priority issues which need attention is the lack of Outcomes, in Community engagement, self-determination (autonomy), lack of cultural appropriate services (non-Aboriginal services delivering to Aboriginal people). Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women ask that Government Agencies to implement a coordination approach for Aboriginal specific funding, Government need to listen and empower communities for change to happen, successful achievements to be promoted i.e. need more positive stories told not always negative ones, and to develop a model that expands/replicates to other initiatives that will encourage success for outcomes to other programs, and not reinvent the wheel.

Reward Success, promote National and local leadership programs (men’s youth and Women), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women recommend strongly to implement existing recommendations from successful reports e.g. Royal Commission Report into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, Little Children are Sacred, Bringing them Home to improve promotion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in Leadership in Urban, Remote, Regional, Mainstream Australia.



4 June 2010

Message for Hon Tanya Plibersek MP, Minster for the Status of Women

National Women Alliance

The Federal Government has set up a six National Women’s Alliance. One of the six is a New National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Alliances, and their process will be to raise the concerns and views of Indigenous women nationally.

Now Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the Northern Territory have asked not to be called Indigenous, as we are the only, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the World, and that’s the identity they wish to keep.

The new Alliances have been formed to raise issues from their Communities, in their own words, with their own agendas and solutions. How is this going to work? How will consultations be held here in theNorthern Territory, especially in the remote areas of Central Australia, East and West Arnhem Land, Victoria River Districts, the Daly Port Keats area, Katherine,TiwiIslands, and Barkley areas?

What will the process be if Consultations are held prior to the Alliances meet? Do they have contacts throughout the Territory? Do they know how to contact Women in remote Communities? Do they have a list of Elders they need to talk with? Are they able to travel to the remote Communities? Many question which have not yet been addressed.

Aboriginal Women living in remote Communities have no idea what the Alliance is or how this will help them. I’m afraid to say that no way can this be a true picture about the issues concerns that will be raised by the Alliance on behalf of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women living in the remote areas of the Northern Territory.

At present the NATSIWG has this contact with the remote communities here in the NT. It has work and their issues have been tabled from consultation which have been held in the Territory.

It is believed that the Alliance will report to the Federal Government cutting out the States and local Minsters.

How is it going to operate in Closing the Gap? How can this team of Women change the Intervention? Are they able to have the change so that Aboriginal Women living in the remote Communities here in theNorthern Territorywill be able this year to take their Children and Grandchildren to the Territory Show?

There is no way that our messages from the Northern Territory can be heard. Yes, we do have one rep from Alice Springs, but for the Federal Government to believe that all diversity throughout the Territory and also across Australia are the same, they need to be fully aware that they are completely different.

If this is the voice for the Federal Government how will they get the message from our local State Ministers and from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women regarding the Northern Territory issues and concerns without the consultation first, which from the start has not happened.



4 May 2010


Remote Communities in the NT: Full-time employment v’s Part-time employment, and programs for young women

I am speaking for myself here as an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Descent Women, my mothers Mother was born on Badu Island in the Torres Strait.

I was sitting in a listening to some people talking about employment, and as I was listening I heard that the Aboriginal people here in the Northern Territory like to work part time, when I first started working I was on limited tenure, and was not able to start paying Superannuation until I become permanent some 5 years later, I wonder if those who believe that Aboriginal people only like to work part-time got their information from, full time position to enable them to look for the future, somewhere improvements are needed Remote Aboriginal people to survive.

Full time employment made available out in the Remote Communities, through the Shires, mentoring and developing young Women Leadership programs, which can be monitored, evaluated, training with resources and extra funding for the Young Women to progress as the future leaders.

Training should start before the young ladies leave school, there should be a program set in place similar to Work Experience, but the opportunity to pick a career, because of the lack of Health Workers, Doctors, Nurses and Educators in the Remote Communities, a 12 month funded program for the Younger ladies put in place in one of the Government either Federal, State or Local Government areas.



18 April 2010

NT Intervention - What has not happened

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in the Northern Territory would like to be referred to as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women, and not Indigenous. Indigenous is a name given to the first people of every country, but we are the only Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander’s in the world.

The Northern Territory delegates who are attending the 2010 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Gathering (NATSIWG) in Canberra in late May have consulted with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Darwin and Alice Springs to find out the issues that impact on their lives.

Those who attended theDarwinforum listed the following as the main issues impacting on their lives: funding, housing, child protection, stolen generation, lack of outcomes and lack of support for successful initiatives.

Those who attended theAlice Springsforum listed the following as the main issues impacting on their lives: housing, racial division, employment, lack of in remote communities, education, and a lack of a representative voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

At both forums Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women expressed their concern and disappointment that numerous reports have been completed on issues impacting on their people, but that a number of recommendations from these reports have not been actioned.

Participants also highlighted the lack of support they encounter when undertaking representative roles from their workplace.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women stated that they would like to see successful initiatives supported and rolled out to other communities, and for government funding to be culturally appropriate and allow for pay equity.

Concerns were raised at the Alice Springs forum there are not enough shelters. Women have been turned away because the shelters are full. This results in an unsafe environment, as women are unable to leave their homes when they need to.

All communities need functional women’s centres, safe houses and cooling down places to be in every community in the Remote areas ofCentral Australia.

The intervention has not addressed the issues of Domestic Violence in keeping the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women safe.

There is a need to develop a Strong Women’s Council for women of all ages, to share culture and knowledge.

The ladies from Barkly region have to travel to Alice Springs, often unaccompanied, to give birth. However, there is a lack of accommodation and transport in Alice Springs.

Alice Springs participants also advised that appropriate community consultations need to occur before decisions are made by bureaucrats that impact on those living in remote Aboriginal communities.